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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 128-131

Nasal colonization and antibiotic resistance of staphylococcus species isolated from healthy veterinary personnel at veterinary medical care facilities in Tripoli


1 Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya
2 Institute of Veterinary Research of Tunisia, University of Tunis El Manar, Bab Saadoun, Tunis, Tunisia
3 Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mohamed Omar Ahmed
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tripoli, P.O. Box 13662, Tripoli
Libya
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ljms.ljms_53_21

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Background/Aim: Veterinary medical personnel may carry important antibiotic-resistant organisms playing important role in their dissemination and emergence. The purpose of the study was to investigate nasal colonization and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus species isolated from veterinary personnel (VP). Methods: A total of 47 VP were sampled, whereby nasal samples were subjected to selective and typical laboratory protocols. Presumptive isolates were further confirmed and fully characterized by the Phoenix automated microbiological system then further tested by polymase chain reactions for mecA and panton-valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes. Results: A total of 34 (72%) VP were colonized with various species, mostly coagulase-negative staphylococci. A collection of 34 staphylococci isolates were collected of which 21% and 6% were, respectively, positive for mecA and pvl genes expressed exclusively by Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. Conclusion: VP may carry various staphylococci species of public health importance expressing multidrug resistant and virulent traits. Preventative measures and continuous monitoring are required to control the spread of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in veterinary clinics.


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